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Are You Claiming Preference for EU Goods?

From January 2021, if your goods originate in the EU or UK, you may be able to claim a preferential rate of duty when importing into certain countries and released to free circulation. This means they will be free of customs duty.

 

To claim preference of duty your goods must originate in the EU as set in chapter 2 of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement ‘rules of origin’ and the ‘Product Specific Rules of Origin’ contained in Annex ORIG-2.

 

If your goods do not meet the rules of origin requirements (or if you cannot prove that the goods meet them) you’ll still need to pay Customs Duty.

To take advantage of preferential tariffs when importing into the UK from the EU (or importing into the EU from the UK), the importer will be need to declare they hold proof that the goods comply with the rules of origin.

You must include a statement on origin that the goods originate from the EU. As a template please include the below statement to your invoices when claiming preference:

 

The exporter of the products covered by this document (ENTER EORI NUMBER) declares that, except where otherwise clearly indicated, these products are of EU or GB preferential origin

 

When exporting to the EU you must include your EORI number in any statement you issue to your EU customer, regardless of the value.

The statement on origin must be provided on an invoice, describing the originating product in sufficient detail to enable its identification.

You can claim preference for different goods on the same document. You’ll need to clearly identify the goods that are originating and non-originating.

BREXIT UPDATE: UK Officially Leave the EU on 31st January 2020


It is official; the UK will leave the EU on 31st January 2020. The UK will enter the transition period from 1st February 2020 until 31st December 2020.

The EU President (Ursula von der Leye) and Boris Johnson have now signed the WAB (The Withdrawal Agreement) which just anticipates approval from the EU parliament. The WAB warrants the UK leave the EU in methodically and provides a transition period.

The transition period will commence on the 1st February 2020, and conclude on 31st December 2020. In this time, nothing changes and existing agreements remain the same.

The most important part of this transition period for our customers, is that trade remains as present. There is no need for amendments when shipping goods to and from Europe until the commencement of the transition period at the end of 2020.

This period allows time for the UK and EU to consult the prospective relationship. We understand the concerns of our customers, partners and colleagues of what Brexit will mean for us all.

We will continue to keep you updated with an important Brexit News.

Brexit Update: Delayed

As the original Brexit departure date approaches, it is key to note that last week Theresa May was granted an extra two weeks to find a Brexit solution after talks with EU leaders. Originally Brexit was due to commence this week on 29th March 2019. However if Theresa May can get her withdrawal deal through parliament the final Brexit date will be pushed to 22nd May 2019 to give time to pass necessary legislation. If said deal is not agreed, the UK will be leaving the EU on 12th April.

Diagram from BBC News article. Click here for direct link

For extended information on this subject find a detailed article here